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On Sunday morning, Italy sleeps. We walk down the street past darkened storefronts – the pharmacy, the corner store, the bakery. Though some restaurants do stay open, our favorites are run by families that also like to have a day off. There are some days I love the excuse of not being able to get errands done, to have one more reason to stay under the covers with coffee and a book, but on other days when I desperately need something, it is infuriating.

In the US if you need something, you can get it. 24 Hour CVS/Walgreens/Rite Aid was my best friend on many occasions and sometimes I desperately wish I could walk through those sliding doors onto that terrible gray carpet and bad lighting and get whatever I needed, and then whatever I wanted (normally that included some kind of chocolate I didn’t know I wanted, and a drink that was either terribly bad or terribly good for me).

Just recently in the news here, the largest political conversation was about bringing back obligatory business-closures on Sundays and holidays. One of the main reasons for it? Because people are missing out on spending time with their families and getting outdoors if they’re working all weekend. That, I could get used to – but tourism ruins it because regardless of the rules, a hotel has to be open on the weekend. Someone’s gotta work.

Closed up Sundays for us just means planning the week more and making sure we don’t leave anything till the last minute. If I do have to do something, I have to already be resigned to the fact that it will take me at least three times as long to do – if I can even accomplish it at all especially if Rami isn’t around to drive (which is another problem I’ll soon be hopefully accomplishing).

The positive honestly and regularly outweigh the negatives on this topic for me, though, and I’m normally pretty happy to plan my Sundays around drives through the countryside to local weekend festivals for good food, wine, and (currently) Christmas markets – which is where we ended up today. 🙂